Fiji calls for a Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty at the UN Climate Talks in

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Fiji has reaffirmed its commitment to the Port Vila Call for a Just Transition to Fossil Fuel Free Pacific in a statement during a side event at the UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, expressing Fiji’s support for the call for the negotiation of a Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty.

Genevieve Jiva, from the Fiji Government says, “We cannot afford to delay action any longer. Our climate is radically changing, and with it, our ecosystems, our livelihoods and our cultures all come under increasing threat. The time for bold, ambitious and transformative measures is now. Fiji reaffirms our support for the Port Vila Call for a Just Transition to a Fossil Fuel Free Pacific and in doing so, we join our Pacific neighbours in calling for the development of a Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty, to ensure we meet the goals established under the Paris Agreement.”

Fiji emphasised the need for greater international cooperation to phase out fossil fuels, which are by far the primary causes of climate change and escalating climate impacts, accounting for 86 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions in the past decade.

As one of the nations least responsible for this crisis, Fiji highlighted the devastating loss and damage they are already facing due to rising sea levels and extreme weather events, calling on nations to urgently join a bloc of Pacific Island nation states in starting discussions for a new treaty.

Joseph Sikulu, 350.org Pacific Managing Director says, “We welcome Fiji’s support of the Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty and the call for an urgent phase out of fossil fuels globally. Fiji and other Pacific Island leaders have a long history of climate leadership, one that we will draw strength from as we prepare for the COP28 climate talks in UAE this November. With oil CEO, Al Jabar, at the helm of COP28 this year, we are going to need all of the Pacific strength we can get to fight the propaganda of fossil fuel expansion. Another world is possible, one built on justice, equity and safe renewable energy, and I firmly believe the Pacific is going to lead us in getting there.”

Alisi Rabukawaqa, 350.org Pacific Council Elder says, “Even as one of the nations least responsible for the climate crisis, we shoulder some of the most devastating loss and damage. The fight against the climate crisis is fought on multiple fronts – through community and storytelling, through activism and diplomacy. It is reassuring to hear of Fiji’s call for a global phase out of climate-destroying fossil fuels, to know that our Pacific leaders are on the frontlines with us in this fight. Now, we urge the global community to stand with us.”

Collectively, all 14 Pacific Island Developing States contribute just 0.23 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, while being the most vulnerable to their impacts. In contrast, the 15 largest emitters of fossil fuels — a group which includes Australia — together contribute more than 70 percent of global emissions while claiming to be climate leaders.

SOURCE: 350.ORG/PACNEWS