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Germany support Fiji's COP23 Presidency
3:25 pm GMT+12, 07/11/2017, Germany

Germany will stand by Fiji and support its presidency of COP23 - the largest and ongoing UN negotiations on climate change.
 
This was put to the Prime Minister and newly elected president of COP23 Frank Bainimarama by Germany's Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Construction and Nuclear Safety Barbara Hendricks.
 
During bilateral talks held at the margins of COP23, Prime Minister Bainimarama welcomed the comments adding that Fiji's presidency would not be possible without the assistance of Germany. The meeting was an opportunity for him to personally thank the people and Government of Germany, through Minister Hendricks, for hosting the COP23.
 
Minister Hendricks also thanked Prime Minister Bainimarama for the traditional ceremony of welcome accorded to her at the opening session of COP23 and said she was humbled to witness this traditional event in Bonn.
 
Prime Minister Bainimarama gave a brief overview to Minister Hendricks on Fiji's presidency including its vision for a Presidency that is transparent and inclusive of all, advances the Paris Agreement and accelerates climate action for vulnerable societies, drawing on our own experiences as a small island developing state in the Pacific.
 
Meanwhile, linking the impacts of climate change to indigenous communities around the world dominated the "Indigenous People's Day" event at COP23 today at the "Bonn Zone" in Bonn, Germany.
 
Fiji's Ambassador to the European Union and COP23 climate ambassador, Deo Saran,joined participants that included artists, musicians, climate activists, senior UN and government officials and NGOs at this event to look at how climate change has not only impacted indigenous communities but how they are also using their own cultural and traditional knowledge to address this. This was an area that Ambassador Saran said was important in combating the impacts of climate change.
 
“We know firsthand, from our Pacific experience, that climate change disproportionately affects local communities and indigenous peoples who often live in and depend on fragile ecosystems. The impacts of climate change are already threatening homes, livelihoods, cultures and nations. For indigenous peoples, resilience to climate change is rooted in traditional knowledge. Indigenous knowledge and practices can greatly contribute to advancing nature-based solutions for both mitigation and adaptation,” Ambassador Saran said.

SOURCE: DEPTFO NEWS/PACNEWS


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