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NZ to play greater role on Climate change
03:05 am GMT+12, 12/02/2019, New Zealand

New Zealand feels it can play a stronger and more vital role with regards to climate change in the Pacific.
 
New Zealand's Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio says most parts of the world especially the major players who contribute to carbon emissions, are still oblivious to what the Pacific is experiencing particularly in the low lying atolls of Kiribati, Tuvalu and Marshall Islands.
 
Sio was speaking through a video message at the opening of the Pacific Islands News Association (PINA) CEO’s Summit in Auckland this morning.
 
“So, we have a role to play not only in helping our population better understand the impact of climate change but we have a role to educate the rest of the world of the impact of rising sea water levels,” Sio said.
 
He added, the rest of the world also needs to know what this would mean for food security and a host of other issues like health and the risk associated if at the end of the day the signs play out and people will be displaced.
 
Already, the New Zealand government last year agreed to a long term strategy in development assistance for the region that focuses on practical projects for climate change adaption, mitigation, and ways to avert climate displacement of people.

Meanwhile, Cook Islands will next month launch its Climate Change Country programme which will guide efforts to build the country’s resilience to the impacts of climate change.
 
Opening the inaugural PINA CEO’s Summit in Auckland, New Zealand this morning, Cook Islands Deputy Prime Minister Mark Brown said it will be launched during the Climate Change Investment Roundtable which will they will be hosting.
 
"We hope that NZ and other friends will demonstrate support towards our resilience-building ambitions," said Brown.
 
The programme is will contain a wide range of projects and programmes that will help the country limit emissions and adapt to climate change.
 
Like many low lying Pacific island nations, Cook Islands is experiencing increasing sea levels quicker than the global average of 2.8 – 3.6 mm per year. It’s been rising 4mm a year since 1993.
 
Data has also shown a clear increase in annual rainfall as well as temperature.

source: PEJN/PACNEWS

 


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