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Former PNG PM O’Neill arrest warrant stayed by court, O’Neill questions role of Police Minister
5:35 pm GMT+12, 16/10/2019, Papua New Guinea

The warrant of arrest obtained by Papua New Guinea police at the Waigani District Court against former Prime Minister Peter O'Neill has been temporarily stayed.
 
National Court Judge Justice Nicholas Miviri issued the orders at 5 o'clock Wednesday.
 
This follows an application by O'Neill seeking a temporary injunction to prevent police from questioning him in relation to official corruption charges.
 
The application was made ex-parte or by O'Neill's lawyer Greg Shepard without the other party as it was considered urgent.
 
The National Court was satisfied all reasons given by O'Neill met requirements to issue a temporary injunction, pending the appearance of all parties next Monday to argue the case.
 
O'Neill is questioning the merits of the arrest warrant including the information given to obtain the warrant.
 
Police will argue their case as to whether the warrant was properly issued based on the information presented next Monday.
 
O'Neill is seeking to permanently stay the warrant of arrest and have it dismissed by the National Court.
 
Meanwhile, three points of order by the Police Minister Bryan Kramer to questions directed by Ialibu-Pangia MP Peter O’Neill to Prime Minister James Marape was finally resolved when the Deputy Speaker of Parliament Jeffery Komal told Kramer to sit down.
 
In a series of questions directed to the prime minister, O’Neill questioned the job description of a police minister, legal compliance of how projects are procured and the letter of former acting police commissioner Francis Tokura raising allegations against Kramer.
 
However, as he was trying to raise his questions, Kramer interjected with points of orders stating that the former prime minister was raising questions based around the warrant of arrest.  O’Neill fired back saying that he had yet to raise the questions.
 
When he continued his line of question into why the police minister was interfering with police matters, Kramer again interjected saying that he was making an allegation.
 
O’Neill, however, said that he had not made reference to the case.
 
“The case itself is a conflict of interest with the complainant (being) the police minister,” he said.
 
Komal told  Kramer to resume his seat and allow the Member for Ialibu-Pangia to complete his series of questions.
 
In response, Marape said while the different projects were noted by the members of parliament, if it was correctly appropriated and used for what it was requested for then there would be no problem. “As long as it was done within the provisions of the law,” he said
 
“In regards to the jobs of the police minister and the police commissioner,”  Marape said, “the minister’s role was purely policies and functions to ensure the constabulary runs, while the role of the police commissioner was to ensure matters by police were attended to.”
 
The prime minister also confirmed having received the letter from Tokura.
 
“I have not been shown clear evidence of my police minister tampering with police operational matters.
 
“Operational matters remain the function of the commissioner of police. With the police minister, there is a clear demarcation of role in the area of policies,” he said.....

SOURCE: NBC NEWS PNG/POST COURIER/PACNEWS


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